Schools That Can builds an education to employment pathway that closes the opportunity and skills gap.

ABOUT SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Schools That Can is a national not-for-profit network of K-12 schools in multiple cities, focused on providing culturally relevant career readiness programming that helps schools meet student needs. Our programming enables students to develop hard skills, soft skills, and confidence needed to be successful after high school.

High schools can no longer relegate career readiness to random electives or a student to career counselor ratio of 464:1. Preparing students for post-secondary success is too important. That’s why STC is expanding its one-of-a-kind career readiness curriculum to 96 hours over the critical years of 10th, 11th, and 12th grades by Fall 2022. This curriculum with industry volunteer coaching and workplace experience easily embeds into a school day or after-school at a school’s discretion. STC’s student to career counselor ratio is 20:1.

SCHOOLS THAT CAN’S CAREER READINESS PROGRAMMING

Design Challenge

About Design Challenge

Design Challenge brings together teams of middle or high school students to engage in design thinking challenges to solve local community problems.

Career Skills

About Career Skills

Career Skills provides 32 hours of curriculum that introduces students to high-demand STEM fields such as cybersecurity, robotics, advanced manufacturing, and climate action.

e2e Bridge

About e2e Bridge

e2e Bridge provides 64 hours of invaluable customizable career readiness curriculum with weekly programming that is co-taught by an STC facilitator.

Thought Leadership

About Thought Leadership

Our Thought Leadership Series provides access to leading thinkers in the fields of education, workforce and equity through virtual conversations.

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Why an Education to Employment (e2e) Pathway®?

97%

of Americans think students need real-world skills to succeed beyond school

46%

of parents surveyed wish that more post-secondary options existed for their children.

65%

of parents say their young person faced one or more barriers to a preferred postsecondary pathway.